Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2015

Source: The Evolution of Difficult Childbirth and Helpless Hominin Infants – Annual Review of Anthropology, 44(1):55

Read Full Post »

Source: Fallback Foods, Optimal Diets, and Nutritional Targets: Primate Responses to Varying Food Availability and Quality – Annual Review of Anthropology, 44(1):493

Read Full Post »

Source: Suffixation influences receivers’ behaviour in non-human primates | Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences

Read Full Post »

Source: Kyoto University Research Information Repository: DIET OF SAVANNA CHIMPANZEES IN THE UGALLA AREA, TANZANIA

Read Full Post »

Scientific Reports is an online, open access journal from the publishers of Nature. The 2014 Impact Factor for Scientific Reports is 5.578.

Source: Distinct growth of the nasomaxillary complex in Au. sediba : Scientific Reports

Read Full Post »

The hominin record from southern Asia for the early Late Pleistocene epoch is scarce. Well-dated and well-preserved fossils older than [sim]45,000 years that can be unequivocally attributed to Homo sapiens are lacking. Here we present evidence from the newly excavated Fuyan Cave in Daoxian (southern China). This site has provided 47 human teeth dated to more than 80,000 years old, and with an inferred maximum age of 120,000 years. The morphological and metric assessment of this sample supports its unequivocal assignment to H. sapiens. The Daoxian sample is more derived than any other anatomically modern humans, resembling middle-to-late Late Pleistocene specimens and even contemporary humans. Our study shows that fully modern morphologies were present in southern China 30,000-70,000 years earlier than in the Levant and Europe. Our data fill a chronological and geographical gap that is relevant for understanding when H. sapiens first appeared in southern Asia. The Daoxian teeth also support the hypothesis that during the same period, southern China was inhabited by more derived populations than central and northern China. This evidence is important for the study of dispersal routes of modern humans. Finally, our results are relevant to exploring the reasons for the relatively late entry of H. sapiens into Europe. Some studies have investigated how the competition with H. sapiens may have caused Neanderthals/’ extinction (see ref. 8 and references therein). Notably, although fully modern humans were already present in southern China at least as early as [sim]80,000 years ago, there is no evidence that they entered Europe before [sim]45,000 years ago. This could indicate that H. neanderthalensis was indeed an additional ecological barrier for modern humans, who could only enter Europe when the demise of Neanderthals had already started.

Source: The earliest unequivocally modern humans in southern China : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Read Full Post »

Source: Ancient Ethiopian genome reveals extensive Eurasian admixture throughout the African continent

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »